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ACM C&R Guidelines

The National Midwifery Guidelines for Consultation and Referral were first introduced in 2004, and are based on similar guidelines in use across other OECD countries, as well as, on a thorough review of contemporary evidence-based practice in maternity care. 

When the ACM first published these Guidelines, there was very little guidance for midwives and doctors who wanted an evidence-based framework for collaboration in the care of individual women. The development of these Guidelines has helped to bridge this gap and provide midwives with an evidence-based tool that can assist them when making decisions about when to discuss, care and/or consult with other midwives, or when to refer a woman's care to a suitably qualified health practitioner. 

Courageous Conversations

This webinar is currently FREE to access and has SELF ENROLMENT capabilities.  All you need to do is log into your ACM Midwives Learn account and get started. 

Managing inappropriate behaviour is a core requirement of any midwife. Confidently delivering the message will also soother your neurology which automatically "alarms" just by thinking about having one. This practical session will: 

  1. Explain why we are triggered into flight or flight
  2. What are the cascades of emotions when thinking about the conversation
  3. What are the 7 detrimental effects of cortisol 
  4. Take command of your nerves though practice
  5. Construct courageous conversations using a 6 step process
  6. Practice delivery of the courageous conversation

Cultural Safety in Maternity Care

What you will learn about

  • The aim of the presentation is for participants to gain an understanding of cultural safety from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspective.
  • Identify ways to support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women, their families and communities. This will also assist with support Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander midwives and midwifery students.

Presented by Angela Coe and Leona McGrath from CATSINaM

Angela Coe

Angela is a proud Sovereign Wiradjuri woman from the Upper Bila Galari- Lachlan River, Cowra area of Central West NSW. A Mother to five boori’s (children) who are proud young Wiradjuri, Bundjalung, Biripi and Gumbaynggirr people.
As a child of the Black Rights Movement, growing up the fight for social and political justice was at the forefront. From the banks of the Bila Galari (Lachlan River) to inner City Sydney Angela experienced both the strength and resilience of the Wiradjuri Nation and vast injustices and inequality enforced on her people and all those who call inner-city Sydney home.  Leaving school and beginning work life in the justice system Angela quickly realised that her passion lay with health and studied to become an Aboriginal Health Worker at Redfern Aboriginal Medical Service, this set Angela on a path to Midwifery a few years later.  Completing a Bachelor of Midwifery at UTS and then working as a Midwife at Gold Coast University Hospital before returning to Redfern.
Angela is currently the Registered Midwife at the Aboriginal Medical Service Redfern, and is proud to be employed at the first AMS in the country and continues to support women and their families. Angela is passionate about providing culturally safe Midwifery care and Decolonising the current Health System.

Leona McGrath

Leona is a proud Aboriginal woman descending from the Kuku Yalanji and Woopaburra people of Queensland. Leona is a mother, grandmother, artist and registered midwife. Leona undertook her midwifery training to be able to care for women from her local community where she grew up in the Redfern and Waterloo suburbs of Sydney. Leona moved into policy in 2011, working in the NSW Health Aboriginal Nursing & Midwifery Strategy for eight years before coming to CATSINaM.

Leona brings a depth of experience to CATSINaM with working clinically as a registered midwife and for Government. Leona’s passion is advocating for, supporting and increasing the Aboriginal nursing and midwifery workforce. Leona is also a board member of the Aboriginal Medical Service, Redfern.

Feldenkrais and the pelvic floor

This Webinar was a practical session narrated by Francesca White and the aim is for listeners to learn how to feel how to differentiate between the functions of the sphincter system from the muscular system and to see that connections will be made between the pelvic floor and the rest of the skeleton.

FARE Pregnancy and Alcohol

This webinar is currently FREE to access and has SELF ENROLMENT capabilities.  All you need to do is log into your ACM Midwives Learn account and get started. 

This webinar focuses on the ‘Women Want to Know’ project which aims to encourage health professionals to routinely initiate conversations with women who are pregnant or planning pregnancy about alcohol consumption and to provide advice consistent with the National Health and Medical Research Council’s Australian Guidelines to reduce the health risks from drinking. The webinar was facilitated by Sarah Ward, FARE.



Hepatitis B in pregnancy (ASHM)

This webinar is currently FREE to access and has SELF ENROLMENT capabilities.  All you need to do is log into your ACM Midwives Learn account and get started. 

This webinar was developed by the Australasian Society for HIV Medicine (ASHM) and has kindly been provided as a resource for midwives. ASHM: https://ashm.org.au/ 



HIV in pregnancy (ASHM)

This webinar is currently FREE to access and has SELF ENROLMENT capabilities.  All you need to do is log into your ACM Midwives Learn account and get started. 

This webinar was developed by the Australasian Society for HIV Medicine (ASHM) and has kindly been provided as a resource for midwives. ASHM: https://ashm.org.au/ 

National Rural Health Student Network

What you will learn about

  • The National Rural Health Student Network work and how you can get involved

Presented by Fiona Fletcher

Fiona grew up on a cattle station in remote central Queensland where she developed an innate appreciation for rural community culture which ignited her passion for rural and remote health. Fiona is now based in Sydney, studying her Bachelor of Nursing at the University of Sydney where she hopes to spark an interest in rural health in other students who haven’t yet considered rural experiences. She is an active member of her rural health club (MIRAGE), having first completed her role as Social Representative in 2018, Treasurer in 2019 and now newly elected as Co-chair for 2020.

She has recently collaborated in projects with the NSW Rural Doctors Network, participated in Rural Nursing Trips in NSW and has completed rural placements in Broken Hill and Bathurst. She also recently presented at the Australian College of Midwives Student Conference in Canberra, September 2019 and was incredibly humbled by the student midwifery community. Fiona is extremely honored to have the opportunity to represent health students on a national platform and to continue collaborating within a supportive network of passionate and influential advocates.

Self-Care for Midwives

Did you know that midwives and nurses have among the highest rates for  suicide and unhealthy weight ranges in the country by profession? With these concerning statistics its never been more important to self care in a profession where workplace environments are taxing,  workloads are increasing and  staff are often pushed to their limits. Yet rarely do we see self-care role modelled in the workplace, nor is it really understood for its importance.

It is time this changed, and midwifery is definately placed to be a leading light in this for other health care professions if we so choose. Self -care can be very simple and self motivating once we understand how to integrate it into our daily working and home lives.

Still Aware driving stillbirth change

This webinar is currently FREE to access and has SELF ENROLMENT capabilities.  All you need to do is log into your ACM Midwives Learn account and get started. 

The webinar information is compiled from published research data. Through prenatal care, an expectant families individual history should be considered and a conversation relating to potential risk factors is suggested. This information is not intended to replace the advice of a trained medical professional. Still Aware provides this knowledge as a courtesy, not as a substitute for personalised medical advice and disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information. Rather, the organisation encourages expectant families and clinicians to ask the questions.